Gary Neville not impressed with defending of Man United star against Tottenham

Manchester United Football Club’s hopes of finishing in the top four were made mathematically impossible by Tottenham Hotspur on Sunday. The Lilywhites beat Jose Mourinho’s men 2-1, and in truth, the Red Devils never looked like winning the match.

Gary Neville was quite damning of his former team on commentary, and to be brutally honest, everything he said was 100% true. United just didn’t look up for the game from the first minute right the way to the last, and that’s probably because everything now resides on winning the Europa League.

One man, in particular, came in for some harsh words from Neville, and that was club captain Wayne Rooney. When discussing Spurs’ opening goal, the former right-back has claimed it was Rooney’s fault due to the poor defending, as he left his goalkeeper with no chance to save Wanyama’s brilliantly directed header.

“It’s a great start for Spurs. Ben Davies puts a wonderful ball into the area. Rooney gets underneath it and loses Wanyama.” Neville told Sky Sports, quoted by the Sport Review.

“It’s poor defending by the captain. It was question of whether Victor could get the accuracy and contact. David De Gea had no chance.”

It’s sad to see this rapid downfall from our captain. This is a guy who is supposed to lead from the front and set an example, but he just doesn’t look all that good anymore. The rest of the players must be looking at him in amazement, as he cannot complete a simple pass to his teammates, and I actually feel quite sorry for him.

In my opinion, he has to be sold this coming summer. The main concern now is exactly where will he go? I just don’t see any Premier League club wanting to take a gamble by bringing him in, as he won’t be cheap and for the output you’ll get from Rooney, it probably isn’t worth it.

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I’m a 25-year old aspiring writer and I created the blog as a platform to discuss all things Manchester United. Season Ticket holder block E332.